AHLA Calls on Scott Bennett to Discuss Big Data, Artificial Intelligence Impact on Patient Privacy with Connections Magazine

AHLA Calls on Scott Bennett to Discuss Big Data, Artificial Intelligence Impact on Patient Privacy with Connections Magazine

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) with big data is raising serious questions about privacy, such as whether the legal standards for deidentifying health information need updating.  Attorney Scott Bennett discussed this issue in a recent article for the American Health Lawyers Association’s Connectionsmagazine, “Patient Privacy in an Era of Big Data and Artificial Intelligence.” The article was part of the magazine’s feature on the top 10 issues in health law for 2020. In the article, Scott explained when personal information is deidentified, it is no longer protected by HIPAA and other privacy laws. AI technologies – combined with the vast amounts of data now available about nearly every aspect of people’s lives – are making it increasingly easy to identify individuals from supposedly deidentified data. That is raising questions...

Read MoreRead More
Scott Bennett, Melissa Soliz Contribute to American Health Lawyers Association’s Corporate Practice of Medicine: A 50 State Survey

Scott Bennett, Melissa Soliz Contribute to American Health Lawyers Association’s Corporate Practice of Medicine: A 50 State Survey

Restrictions on the corporate practice of medicine  vary from state to state, which can create challenges for health care providers and practices. Attorneys Scott Bennett and Melissa Soliz helped clarify this complex set of regulations, contributing to the second edition of the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA)’s Corporate Practice of Medicine: A 50 State Survey. Melissa and Scott wrote the chapter of the book that explains corporate-practice restrictions in Arizona. Scott has extensive experience assisting clients in health care and other industries with information privacy and security. He helps clients work to prepare for and avoid data breaches, and to comply with federal and state breach laws if a security incident occurs. He is a Certified Information Privacy Professional/United States (CIPP/US) through the International Association of Privacy Professionals. He serves as Chair...

Read MoreRead More
Melissa Soliz Breaks Down How Privacy Laws Prevent Effective Substance Use Treatment in Journal of Health Care Compliance

Melissa Soliz Breaks Down How Privacy Laws Prevent Effective Substance Use Treatment in Journal of Health Care Compliance

The opioid epidemic is a national crisis that kills approximately 130 people per day, according to the CDC. In an article for the Journal of Health Care Compliance, Melissa Soliz shared that while treatment for opioid addiction is expanding, outdated privacy laws are stymying treatment efforts.  Melissa provided an overview of 42 C.F.R. Part 2 (the federal Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Record regulations, known as Part 2), which was promulgated in the 1970s to protect the information of people seeking substance use disorder treatment. She explains the barriers Part 2 creates when health care providers need to access or share substance use disorder information protected by Part 2 for treatment, payment, public health activities, and ordinary health care operations. She also proposed solutions to fix the problem.  Melissa’s legal practice...

Read MoreRead More
Melissa Soliz Breaks Down How Privacy Laws Prevent Effective Substance Use Treatment in Journal of Health Care Compliance

Melissa Soliz Contributes to American Health Lawyers Association’s Opioid Crisis and Prescribing Survey

The opioid epidemic has been declared a public health emergency. Attorney Melissa Soliz contributed to the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA)’s recent “State Response to Opioid Crisis and Opioid Prescribing Requirements: A 50 State Survey,” a resource guide providing an overview and references regarding the opioid epidemic on a state-by-state basis.  Melissa and co-authors Benjamin Runkle of Gammage & Burnham and D’Arcy Downs-Vollbracht of Concierge Legal Group, PLLC, highlighted the results of efforts to combat the opioid epidemic in Arizona, such as the Arizona Opioid Epidemic Act of 2018, opioid prescribing and treatment regulations, pain management clinic regulations, and opioid-poisoning related reporting regulations.  Melissa focuses on HIPAA and 42 C.F.R. Part 2 compliance, compliance with opioid treatment laws and regulations, health information exchange (including compliance with new information blocking rules),...

Read MoreRead More
What All U.S. Businesses Need to Know About the California Consumer Privacy Act

What All U.S. Businesses Need to Know About the California Consumer Privacy Act

A new California privacy law goes into effect on January 1, and it will require major changes in how many companies in Arizona – and the rest of the United States – handle consumers’ personal information. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) applies far beyond companies with a physical presence in California. It can apply to any company that simply does business in California, which can include providing goods or services to California residents. In today’s mobile and global society, that’s an astounding number. One privacy organization estimates that the CCPA will apply to 500,000 companies in the United States, including many small- and medium-sized businesses. The groundbreaking legislation expands privacy rights for consumers and changes the way businesses disclose and use personal information. Here, we’ll cover which businesses...

Read MoreRead More
It’s Time …. For Overtime Pay Regulation

It’s Time …. For Overtime Pay Regulation

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently announced its long-awaited final rule updating the salary threshold for executive, administrative, and professional employees who are classified as exempt from the minimum wage and overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). These are often referred to as the “white collar” exemptions. The new rule will take effect on January 1, 2020. What is the new minimum salary? Earlier this year, the DOL released a proposed rule that would have raised the minimum salary level for white collar exempt employees to $679 per week, or $35,308 per year. After evaluating compensation data and considering many thousands of public comments, the DOL increased those figures slightly in the final rule. The new salary threshold will be $684 per week,...

Read MoreRead More